Lunch Workshops

Lunch Workshops :

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Dear ISM2016 participants, you are cordially invited to participate in the lunch workshops which will take place during the meeting :

  • There will be a total of 3 workshops on each day (total 9 workshops – details in the table below) during lunch time.
  • The duration of each workshop: 45 minutes.
  • For Workshop participants lunch will be served in the workshop area, on the 5th floor.
  • Participation in the Lunch Workshops requires ,filling out the on-line form below by May 26 and registration on-site, on the morning of the selected workshop.
  • To register on-site, please check/add your name on the Workshops Registration List to be placed on the Workshops bulletin board, on the morning of your selected workshop, by the end of the morning coffee break (after the plenary session).
  • The number of participants in each workshop is limited.



Date :
Tuesday - May 31st
12:30-13:30
Wednesday - June 1st
12:00-13:00
Thursday - June 2nd
12:00-13:00
Hall D
Company :companies_ logos AVBA
FEI
companies_ logos AVBA
FEI
companies_ logos AVBA
Protochips Inc.
Moderator : Ben Lich,
FEI Company
Daniel Phifer,
FEI Company
Mathias O. Mosig,
EMEA Protochips Inc.
Topic :
Hall E
Company :companies_ logos AVBA
Nano Instruments Ltd. (WITec GmbH)
companies_ logos AVBA
Bruker Nano GmbH
companies_ logos Danyel
Danyel Biotech (GE Healthcare Life Sciences)
Moderator : Philippe Ayasse,
WITec GmbH
Andi Kaeppel and Max Patzschke,
Bruker Nano GmbH
Przemyslaw Fleszar,
GE Healthcare Life Sciences
Topic :
Hall F
Company :companies_ logos Gatan
Gatan (AVBA)
companies_ logos Gatan
Gatan (AVBA)
companies_ logos Gatan
Gatan (AVBA)
Moderator : Paul Spellward & Colleagues,
Gatan Inc.
Paul Spellward & Colleagues,
Gatan Inc.
Paul Spellward & Colleagues,
Gatan Inc.
Topic :

This workshop will discuss the increasingly popular Serial Block Face SEM technique, as deployed with the Gatan 3View system.

Advanced research, for example in Neuroscience, increasingly requires full knowledge of 3D structures and connections over large volumes but with spatial resolution at FEG-SEM levels. Fields of view of order 1x1x1mm3 can be achieved via a SEM hosted microtome, within realistic timescales. Such volumes are not attainable with FIB-SEMs. The block face image datasets are inherently aligned and acquisition is highly automated, unlike TEM serial sectioning where sections may be lost, distorted and misaligned and the whole process is labour intensive.

The Gatan 3View system is a based on a solid stage which replaces the SEM’s own stage, assuring reproducibility and fine control, rather than a lightweight module on a standard SEM stage. Z resolution is controlled by slice thickness and there is no need (or benefit) for multiple voltage images on one block face. The Gatan 3View hardware will be discussed and experimental workflows described.

Applications of Serial Block Face SEM in neuroscience, cell biology, botany, and drug delivery will be mentioned. The technique is also used in polymers and Material Science; example of work on soft metals will be presented.
This workshop will discuss the most powerful analytical technique in TEM: Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS).

EELS, like EDS, can measure local composition. However, it is far more powerful than EDS because it brings additional information on local chemistry, valency, and a wealth of other details. For most elements, EELS has higher or much higher sensitivity and better signal to noise. Even for very heavy elements, recent comparisons show EELS at least as good as EDS. Even with new “large area” EDS systems, the collection efficiency for EELS is vastly higher and this is reflected in the quality of elemental “maps”.

The workshop will discuss EELS Spectrometer (Enfinium) and Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF Quantum) hardware and will introduce the new Gatan Microscopy Suite (GMS) 3 software. GMS3 includes new model-based quantification for EELS and EDS. Recently, advances in control of EDS systems from GMS has enabled co-acquisition of EELS and EDS at 1000 spectra per second. Examples of co-acquired data will be shown.

This workshop will be useful for researchers who have not used EELS before, but also, especially, for users of older generation systems who will appreciate the improvements in the new systems and software. Also, if you have been told “EDS is all you need”, then come and hear an account of why you would be better with EELS.
This workshop will discuss both modern scintillator based cameras and advanced direct detection systems, also with emphasis on speed for in situ work.

Digital cameras for TEMs were initially a film substitute, only used for final acquisition, because they were too slow for use whilst searching or focussing. In more recent times, cameras became faster and could be used less painfully in fast readout modes, at reduced resolution or from sub-areas. Finally, OneView has arrived. Gatan's new sensor technology allows a full 4K x 4K image to be constantly refreshed at 25 frames per second.

OneView has no compromises on read-out area or resolution and a very easy, streamlined user experience. Furthermore, this technology enables real time drift correction during image acquisition. Sharp images are available even from drifting or unstable samples. With the addition of the "in situ" option, this camera can be accelerated to >200 frames per second, opening new experimental possibilities for dynamic TEM studies.

The limitations of scintillator cameras for low dose work (whether from inherently fragile specimens or because the exposure needs to be so short to enable very fast imaging) are overcome by using direct (electron) detection cameras. Gatan’s K2 Summit camera is well established as the only commercially available, fast, counting direct detector. It can be used by for structural biology single particle and tomography work, within existing workflows (2-4 second exposures at 5-10eA-2). It has the best DQE of any such camera and brings additional benefits from dose fractionation and drift correction.

The world’s fastest TEM in situ camera is based on the K2 Summit. With additional processing power and storage, Gatan is offering the K2 IS (K2 In Situ) camera. This is already finding applications in fast imaging for structural and magnetic applications and also in fast STEM diffraction imaging, where whole new application fields are available, for example strain mapping. Some application examples will be presented.
The new and growing portfolio for GE Life Sciences Cell Imaging tools, including DeltaVison OMX and DeltaVision OMX SR open up advanced applications in high and super resolution live cell fluorescence and transmitted light imaging, using widefield deconvolution, localization microscopy, and structured illumination microscopy (SIM) super resolution modalities. These cutting edge hardware platforms use class leading technologies in concert with sensitive and powerful image analysis platform give the user the power to address biological questions in cell biology that previously lay out of reach, covering microscopic scales from tissues, cell colonies and single cells, through to molecular organization of individual cells in live samples, using multi-channel fluorescence detection and transmitted light methods. During the workshop we will discuss the principles and benefits of SIM technology. We will also cover wide range of applications, presenting examples of cell biology, microbiology, virology and live cell super resolution imaging.
As Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) have become the standard detectors for energy dispersive x-ray detection in the last years, special detector designs and concepts can bring the performance to the next level.

A special multi element concept is the XFlash® 5060FQ, an annular detector which can be placed between the pole piece and the sample in a standard SEM using a BSE detector like setup. This setup leads to an extremely large solid angle of more than 1 sr. This is a value which is typically 100 times larger than a 10mm² detectors in a conventional setup. Therefore extremely high count rates can be achieved easily even with low probe currents, and can be processed with four separate electronic channels in parallel, leading to maximum output count rate of more than 1,600,000 cps. These properties make the detector an ideal device for high speed mapping applications or analyzing beam sensitive samples.
RISE Microscopy is a novel correlative microscopy technique which combines confocal Raman Imaging and Scanning Electron (RISE) Microscopy within one integrated microscope system.

This unique combination provides advantages for the microscope user with regard to comprehensive sample characterization: electron microscopy is an excellent technique for visualizing the sample surface structures in the nanometer range; confocal Raman imaging is an established pectroscopic imaging method used for the detection of the chemical and molecular components of a sample with diffraction limited resolution. In contrast to existing combinations, where single Raman spectra are typically collected from few micrometer size areas, the RISE combination allows for the first time diffraction limited confocal Raman imaging on the same sample position as the SEM image was taken. It can also generate 3D-images and depth profiles to visualize the distribution of the molecular compounds within a sample volume. Both analytical methods are fully integrated into the RISE Microscope.
New innovations are transforming the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) from a simple high-resolution image acquisition tool into a nanoscale materials research and development laboratory. Researchers can now better understand material behavior by analyzing samples in real-world gas or liquid environments, at high temperature and with ultra-low noise electrochemical and electrical biasing techniques. With the new in situ tools from Protochips, materials research occurs in highly controlled environments at high resolution without sacrificing the analytical capabilities of the TEM such as EDS. Applications for these tools include heterogeneous catalyst reactions, nanostructure nucleation and growth, battery and fuel cell materials, high temperature nanoparticle behavior, and semiconductor devices. Protochips will present their latest innovations around the Protochips Atmosphere™ 200 Gas Environmental Cell, the newly released Protochips Poseidon™ Select flowing liquid and electrochemistry cell, and the newly released Protochips Fusion™ heating and electrical biasing system.
FEI has achieved a further improvement in resolution and in contrast using a new FEI SEM equipped with a compound electrostatic-magnetic final lens. This new final lens design provides a resolution equal to 1.0 nm at 1 kV acceleration voltage. The compound final lens SEM combines a magnetic final lens in the pole piece, a magnetic immersion final lens and an electrostatic lens formed by the potential at the bottom of the column to achieve excellent contrast as well. Contrast improvement results from the independent in-lens detection of secondary (SE) and backscattered (BSE) electrons. Secondary electrons are separated and independently detected by in-lens and in-column detectors. With the new compound final lens, it is possible to further energy filter the backscattered electrons detected on the lower T1 in-lens detector. When high-loss (low energy) BSEs are filtered out, T1 provides extremely strong material contrast images formed by only low-loss (high energy) BSEs.

The Apreo SEM, equipped with the compound final lens and the in-lens and in-column detectors, improves both the imaging resolution and contrast performance. It allows researchers to capture the maximum amount of information from conductive as well as insulating samples, with the right detail and with the least amount of compromises.
Latest developments in the cryo-TEM workflow have brought the major structural biology technologies (NMR, XRD) closer together.
Now, finally, a continuum has been reached on all important aspects with regards to resolution and macromolecular scales which allows for the full deployment of the combination of these technologies.

We will discuss the future of structural biology based on the latest developments of the FEI workflow and its components.

For resin embedded biological material we introduced a novel workflow for high spatial resolution and throughput SEM volume imaging overcoming the resolution limits set by mechanical slicing by combining it with virtual sectioning. Virtual slicing is realized by FEI's proprietary Multi-Energy de- convolution SEM (MED-SEM), a non-destructive technique that allows high resolution reconstruction of the top layers of the sample.

We will discuss how MED-SEM can be utilized in the workflows that are currently used for resin embedded samples.

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